Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Icicled Sight

 
As we drove by on our way home on Saturday, I spied this house.  It just looked so much like the icicles were keeping the owners from escaping, or from intruders entering (not sure which).

I had to go back to take a picture.

And then I had to write this Monorhyme...a poem in which all the lines have the same end rhyme.

Icicled Sight

We quietly dripped through the night
As long we grew and held on tight,
To mimic cavern's stalactite,
And gain immense reverso height.
Once waking, you beheld your plight
Behind our bars of icy white,
And seeing this, forsook the fight,
Submitting to our gripping bite.
Imprisoned in the dark of night
For no good reason but for spite
(Or maybe just because we might)!
You must remain till sun grows bright
And we are feeling more contrite
Then we will melt, allowing flight,
And you can once again feel light;
And all the world will seem just right
As rain, with butterflies and kite
Instead of snow and icy blight.
But don't forget next year's invite,
'Cus your dismay is our delight.

©Donna JT Smith, 2015

Here's my husband braving the frigid temps and the hip deep snow to remove our icicle imprisonment.  Good thing he had snowshoes!  He tried it without, but you can't get anywhere when you sink to your belt.  BTW, that bit of shrubbery you see poking up is a part of our 5 foot high beach rose bush at the front of our house...there's a lot more where that came from.  You wouldn't want to just try to wade through three feet of thorns hidden beneath the snow!


It's a Slice of Life Tuesday, so go see what's happening in others' lives and maybe look at some Slicer Swag!

Icicles on the side of our house - the corner ones are only a couple of inches off the snow - reaching from ceiling height to interior floor - 8 feet long.


22 comments:

  1. Donna, those icicles remind me of the ones we had when I was a little girl. I was fascinated by them but these look very scary as evidenced by this line, "Behind our bars of icy white." This is an amazing picture. I am so glad that you captured it and created the a monorhyme. very clever. Will this be the poem and picture that you spoke about?

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    1. Good idea...I'll mess about with this today, getting the words on the image. But I may work on another one, too. Then you could have a choice.

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    2. Donna, or I could have two penned by you. Thanks.

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  2. That's an impressive rhyme scheme, Donna. Beautiful poem. (And it's beautiful weather if one doesn't have anyplace to go!)

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    1. Thanks, Stacey! And it is beautiful out here in the Winter Wonderland when you don't have somewhere else to be in a hurry!

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  3. Happy you returned for the picture, and what an amazing one, Donna. I hope you all are out of that deepfreeze soon. We've had our share of blizzards through the years, but never what you all have had recently. Love the poem's laugh at the end from those scary icicles!

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    1. It's been an amazing winter. I guess it's making up for the lighter snowfall last year.
      And about the laughing icicles at the end - don't they always seem to be chuckling at us? Like, "Do what you will, you silly humans, we will just continue to do what we do, too!"

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  4. Your poem is amazing- the rhyme and the rhythm. And your slice reminds me that writing begins with noticing.

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    1. I have an addiction to noticing, which means my husband has to turn the car around a lot if he is driving! There is so much to see and write about, I just hate to miss it. Loved your post today, too.

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  5. Wow, those are some impressive icicles! I can't wait for butterflies and kites and warm blue skies, either.

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    1. The snow and icicles are very impressive this year. They have really outdone themselves!

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    2. Your icicles make my perfect pair pale in comparison (http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2015/02/winters-tiny-perfection.html)

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  6. Those are the longest icicles I've ever seen! Your poem is perfect, love the point of view! I moan about our measly five inches, but will quit now that I've read of your five feet.

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    1. This is going to be the best summer ever!

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  7. This picture takes gingerbread houses with icing to a new level! I would think those things could do some serious damage or danger. I can't even imagine five feet of snow! I would rather just look at the pictures from others!

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    1. Mmmmm. Warm gingerbread....
      Oh, I got distracted....
      Yes, gingerbread houses as in trim...they do cause some damage if you have gutters or the eaves are not strong enough for the weight. And, yes. Icicles can kill you. They are extremely heavy. One of our grocery stores and a school have terrible pitches to their roofs and they have to cordon off areas to keep people from going under the overhanging ice.
      I edited a bit so it was clearer about the amount of snow. We have over 3 feet in our front yard. The rose bushes are 5 feet tall and are mostly covered in snow...bits of it are above the snow in the picture.

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  8. Love the icicles on that house! I saw so many great icicles on houses in Maine, when I visited this past weekend. What an extraordinary winter you are having! I love the poem - my favorite line is "As rain, with butterflies and kite," because these three treasures really do seem far away from us right now. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I was amazed to read your blog and find you were "in the neighborhood" that day! Except for the mud season this year, I am looking forward to a warm, sunny spring. Just need to keep the mud boots close by!

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  9. I've never seen icicles like that in my life! Unbelievable. I love your poem - I totally want to try that, but I don't know I can create a poem that compares to yours!

    If you hadn't explained, I would have thought your husband was walking on the ground. That's a LOT of snow!

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    1. I'm sure you can do it! It's really fun when you get into it. You should try one!
      I just measured a part of the sun melted snow (even though it is cold when the sun shines, it packs down some) and in that spot it was 31 inches - and I'm not sure I got all the way to the ground - it gets packed pretty hard under all the weight. So I know it is at least that deep. Drifting and snowblowing make it hard to tell - I can't get to the spots that are totally untouched because it is hip deep at least. Legs don't move then, and boots get really full! Ha!

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  10. Love the poem and flow of it---write me a spring one too :)

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    1. Check out the poem tomorrow! I started to write a spring one...turned into something different. I'll try again when they stop saying "Here, have some more snow!"
      More snow tonight! Yea. 6 to 10 inches they say.

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