Saturday, April 23, 2016

A to Z on a Plate - T

Today is day 20 of the A to Z Challenge (see navigation on sidebar) - the letter T.  I've photographed and alphabetized vanity plates from our local area in Maine, and am writing poems to go with one for each letter of the alphabet - plus and extra on Sundays, since it is National Poetry Month and I'm committed to writing a poem a day for April.  I am also linking to Margaret Simon's challenge to write a poem in response to a picture each day.  Most pictures are a bit more "picturesque" than mine, but it is still a picture!
And again, if you have a poem inspired by one of these plates, please include it in your comment, or email it, or tell me where to find it on your site, and I will include it in the Sunday review here. 

#atozchallenge #NaPoWriMo #imagepoems

It is also the 2erd day and 23rd line for the Progressive Poem, the brainchild of Irene Latham. Check on the side navigation to go to today's new line.

T is for Two Maine Plates in the poem Today:


Put 'R Thayah

If you ah a Main-ah
Yud bettah talk right
Just put "ahs" where the Rs ah
Add em othuh spawts fuh spite
If you like drawrin' pich-ahs
Just put one ah right thayah
We've omitted enough,
So we have should have a spay-ah.
Don't mattah if yer a teach-ah
The rules ah the say-um
Sayin' ah's not just for doctahs
It's paht of ah fay-um.

©Donna JT Smith, 2016, all rights reserved







See you tomorrow for a plate of U!

#atozchallenge 
Please leave a comment and put your url or link in your comment, so I can jog on over to your site! 

18 comments:

  1. Oh my. That is one of the hardest poems I've ever read aloud! But I get the picture... or rather, the sound! ;) Great job!

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    1. Oooh, maybe I should try recording it and putting it here.

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    1. I didn't realize the accent was there until I moved to Minnesota for 10 years. When I returned, it was shocking to hear my parents speak; but after a while, it was business as usual again!

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  3. This one just BEGGED to be read aloud! So. Much. Fun. "Fay-um," indeed!! HUZZ-AH!

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    1. Wish I'd recorded it. Maybe for next week's Poetry Friday.

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  4. LOVE that poem!! I didn't realize that I had a Maine accent until I went to New York for a college visit. My host made mention of it after about my third or fourth use of 'wicked good.'

    Teach-Ah is a perfect plate for a Maine teacher. :)

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    1. We are slowly losing all these accents. It's a shame to see them go!

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  5. Works for us Rhode IslanDAHS too! lol
    #AtoZ

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    1. I've lived in RI and though they do have an accent, it's not quite the same. We have a few different stresses on words that have to be heard and don't come through with writing!

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  6. Great Main-ah verse. :-) The accent works all ovah New England. :-)

    fly a kite indoors
    juggle cupcakes and teapots
    oh, to be Thing Two!

    I'm tempted to do another for Trout, but I doubt I have time to. So tempting, though. Perhaps I'll be back.

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    1. It has variations depending on which state you are in and even in Maine, the farther north you go the more Canadian it gets. Some parts are heavy French-Canadian even in southern Maine, though.

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  7. Now that is a cute poem to explain how people in Maine talk :)

    betty
    http://viewsfrombenches.blogspot.com/

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  8. Love, love your poem. I'd have a horrible accent if I visited Maine. You'd think I was a foreign-ah
    (oh, wow, I don't think I wrote that right.)

    JEN Garrett

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    1. You'd be summah folk or from away if you was from anuthah state.
      A faw'nah would be from out the states, don'cha know.

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