Tuesday, April 2, 2013

B is for Bucephalus

This post is part of Two Writing Teachers Slice of Life Tuesday AND a tribute to April being poetry month AND the A to Z Challenge - see links on the sidebar for more great writiing or click the linked text.  If you were any part of the March Madness Poetry 2013, they are on the last matchup, having been given their final challenge words: hullabaloo vs bumbershoot.  Voting on the two poems the authletes come up with begins this Wednesday afternoon through the day Thursday .  Check in and vote for your favorite poem.
And now back to the A to Z Challenge for today.
The second day, the second letter...coincidence?  I think not.

The letter B...
Remember to click on the links if you want to learn more about the linked word...like Bucephalus and buoys.

"Bucephalus"

 Bucephalus

I champ at the bit,
A steed of the sea;
My race to the water
Is still yet to be.

I just need some paint,
The buoys do, too;
Get ready to roll
And rock on the blue.


"Bandit"
Penny by penny,
Stealing a dollar;
Swiping the minutes,
Hour by hour...

This bandit of money
and robber of years
Has paid back our family
More good times than tears.


Educational moment:
Berried female = A female lobster with its eggs attached to its swimmerets.
Berries = Lobster eggs.
To protect the whale population:
  1. All buoys must be attached to the buoy lines with a weak link (swivels, plastic weak links, rope, hog rings) having a breaking strength no greater than 600 pounds;
  2. All buoy lines or ground lines must be made entirely of sinking line (they can't float on the water).

18 comments:

  1. Hmm... I'm not sure that boat lives up to the name Bucephalus, but it is a great name. And a great poem to go with it!

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    1. Thanks! And I didn't think it actually lived up to its name either...maybe with some paint and sprucing up after the long winter on the front lawn.

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  2. Beautiful poem...the last line struck a particular chord!

    Jenny @ PEARSON REPORT

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    1. There's a lot invested in these boats - time and money - but there's nothing else they'd rather do.

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  3. Replies
    1. Interesting name. I had to look it up when I found the boat.

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  4. The image of steed of the sea is wonderful.

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    1. That must be what he was going for when he named her. It is a nice way of thinking about your boat!

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  5. I loved Bandit, the boats do cost a lot to maintain, but the pleasure on a boat is priceless.

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  6. I like the bandit, very cool boat. Also thanks for the education, I had no idea!

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  7. Love that first name and a couple of good poems too, I can almost smell the sea.

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  8. Two great names...and that boat does look like a winner, too!

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  9. "Get ready to roll/and rock on the blue"-just great Donna. I like both because you say just enough to give the two (and yesterday's also) a personality, sometimes mischievous, but a part of the boating including too. Nice...

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  10. Ah the boys of the sea...you reveal so much with few words. They make me want to jump aboard.

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  11. Hopefully the two boats are only temporarily dry-docked.

    Popped by from the AtoZ Challenge.

    thriftshopcommando.blogspot.com

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    1. Most lobster boats are brought up on land to sit in the front yard or by the garage for the winters. Only a few are year round because you'd have to go out to deeper waters in less than desirable conditions off the Maine coast. Winter is a busy season getting things repaired and painted, etc. No money coming in, just going out.

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  12. Nicely done..
    I love the line
    "rock on the blue"

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